Welcome Paige – Disaster Services Intern

Paige BurgessMy name is Paige Burgess. I am currently a junior at University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. I am majoring in Human Services Leadership and hope to go on to graduate school. Currently I am a part of the Human Services Leadership Organization, along with going on my fourth year in the University Honors Program and the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Swim team. I have always wanted to help as a profession, even as a child. When I was younger I wanted to help animals and now my interests have grown to helping anyone I can. When I learned about this major I knew I had found what I’ve been looking for. I have been a lifeguard for about five years and knowing that Red Cross does the training was about all I knew about this organization until I did my research. I am truly honored to be interning with the Northeastern Wisconsin American Red Cross team. The amount of work and dedication they have for helping people in need is overwhelming and I am happy that I get to be a part of it.

A little bit about me: I am from Oconomowoc, Wisconsin where my love for helping started. In high school I joined my church on several mission trips. We went to New Orleans twice to help with the destruction from hurricane Katrina and we went to New York to volunteer with multiple soup kitchens and other churches. Coming from a smaller town these experiences really allowed me to see another side of life. Although I am unsure on what I want to do as a profession, I am excited to experience as much as life will offer.

Being given the opportunity to intern with the Red Cross I believe will show me many aspects of my major that I have not considered yet and hopefully this will lead me in the direction of what I would like to do in the future.

Oshkosh Today!

Check out Northeast Wisconsin Chapter Executive, Steve Hansen on Oshkosh Today talking about our Home Fires Campaign!

  • Do you have a plan?
  • Do you practice that plan?
  • Have you checked your smoke detectors?
  • Do you have a smoke detector on every level of your home?

Some simple tips that could save your life!

 

Fire!!! Could this happen to you?

Please watch this news story courtesy of Fox 6 in Milwaukee and then take the actions steps!

Click on link below:

 http://fox6now.com/2015/01/15/five-year-old-boy-receiving-treatment-at-the-hospital-after-two-alarm-blaze-at-duplex-in-milwaukee/

People can take several steps to protect themselves and their loved ones and increase their chances of surviving a fire.

  • Every household should develop a fire escape plan and practice it several times a year and at different times of the day.
    • Include two ways to get out of every room and consider escape ladders for sleeping areas or homes on the second floor or above.
    • Pick a place outside for everyone to meet and make sure everyone knows where it is.
    • Practice that home fire drill until everyone in the household can do it in less than two minutes.
  • Install smoke alarms on every level of the home, inside bedrooms and outside sleeping areas. Test them every month and replace the batteries at least once a year.

Fire experts agree that people may have as little as two minutes to escape a burning home before it’s too late to get out.

10710893_10152718411990071_1668250310886687572_nMore than forty percent (42 percent) of Americans feel confident they can escape their burning home in two minutes. Most parents (69 percent) believe their children would know what to do or how to escape with little help.

  • The problem with these assumptions is that less than half of parents (48 percent)   with children ages 3-17 have talked to their families about fire safety.
  • Only a third (30 percent) of families with children have identified a safe place to meet outside the home.
  • Less than one in five families with children (18 percent) have actually practiced home fire drills.

Seven times a day, someone in this country dies in a home fire. Just in the past month, three lives have been lost in Wisconsin alone. For more information, please visit redcross.org/firesafety

Home Fires Become Top Disaster Threat

Home fires top list of disaster responses throughout Wisconsin

Card Style

 

This year, the Red Cross helped more people affected by home fires than all other disasters combined. Locally trained workers responded at all hours of the day with food, blankets and comfort to help more than 3,451 people with nowhere else to turn after home fires from January 1 to December 1, 2014.

During that same timeframe, the Red Cross also provided financial support to 1,064 households after home fires to help replace lost belongings and begin the long road to recovery. Nationally, the Red Cross responds to a disaster in the community every 8 minutes and the vast majority of these are home fires.

Within December alone, we have already responded to nearly 50 additional fires as this is our busiest month of the year including several large apartment building fires in Milwaukee.

“While tornadoes, floods and hurricanes tend to dominate the headlines, people often underestimate the frequency and devastation caused by home fires, and that’s where the Red Cross comes in,” said Marytha Blanchard, the states Disaster Officer. “Our work doesn’t end after the smoke clears, every day local volunteers are helping people to recover and get better prepared.”

Curbing Deaths and Injuries from Home Fires

Because of the high number of home fires in this country, the Red Cross launched a campaign this year to reduce the number of home fire deaths and injuries by 25 percent over the next five years. The organization is asking every household in America to take two simple steps: check their existing smoke alarms and practice fire drills at home.

Since the campaign launched in October, the Red Cross—in partnership with fire departments and community groups nationwide—has already reached more than 29,000 people by installing 17,000 smoke alarms. These efforts have already saved five lives nationwide. In the Wisconsin Region, we’ve already reached 599 people by installing 342 smoke alarms in Beloit, Chippewa Falls, Kaukauna, Stevens Point and Milwaukee. Based on 5-year historical data, additional neighborhoods are being coordinated for 2015 outreach.

Other Notable Disaster Responses

Within the state, we have responded to numerous other disasters this year, including the Platteville and Verona tornadoes, flooding and even power outages. In addition, our trained responders have also traveled across the country to assist in the California & Texas wildfires, Buffalo blizzard, Oso mudslide, Pilger tornadoes and longer-term casework for the Illinois tornado/flood.

Our work is made possible by the generosity of the American public. You can help people affected by disasters big and small by making a gift to Red Cross Disaster Relief. Your gift enables us to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasters. You can donate by visiting redcross.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS or texting the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. Your donation helps provide food, shelter and emotional support to those affected by disasters.

 

Aaron Rodgers wins QB/RB of the week! FedEx donates to Red Cross

aaron bearsWe’re happy to announce that The American Red Cross of Northeast Wisconsin today received $2,000 from FedEx through its Air & Ground NFL Players of the Week Program. FedEx’s donation will support disaster relief and a variety of urgent humanitarian needs of the Red Cross.

Each week, the NFL nominates three quarterbacks and three running backs who had the best performance the previous weekend. Fans then vote at NFL.com/FedEx for the quarterback and running back who they think performed the best. This past week, our local AARON RODGERS was nominated and won, triggering the generous donation from FedEx.

For more than 15 years, FedEx has worked closely with the Red Cross to ship critical relief supplies across America. FedEx also partnered with the Red Cross to develop a variety of small business preparedness tools. As a $1 million member of the Annual Disaster Giving Program, FedEx ensures the Red Cross is ready to respond immediately after a disaster strikes.

Red Cross helping with emergency housing, food and clothing needs

Fire from 15th Avenue in Green Bay. (photo from http://fox11online.com)

Fire from 15th Avenue in Green Bay. (photo from http://fox11online.com)

The American Red Cross is helping a dozen people – nine adults and three children from four families – after  fires yesterday in (W. Winnebago) Appleton, (Happy Valley Drive) Menasha, (5th Avenue) Green Bay and (N. Ostranda Lane) Crivitz. The Red Cross is meeting with and providing appropriate help for emergency housing, food and clothing needs.

The Red Cross has also provided families with emergency lodging, sweatsuits and personal hygiene kits along with professional resources during this difficult situation. Financial assistance for clothing, food, winter garments and shoes was also provided. Red Cross team members will be available to help the families moving forward from the initial disaster response through recovery.

American Red Cross disaster assistance is free of charge, a gift made possible by generous donations and the work of trained volunteers.

To learn more about the American Red Cross or to make a financial gift please call, text or click. Call 1-800-RED-CROSS, text the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation or click on www.redcross.org

Special Thanks to Our Volunteers, Employees and Donors During Sandy

By: Trevor Riggen, Vice President of Disaster Services Operations and Logistics, American Red Cross

hurricane-sandy09Today marks the two-year anniversary of one of the largest responses in the long and proud history of this organization. It was a storm and challenge so unique that they had to come up with a new name just to describe it – Superstorm Sandy.  It was a massive, powerful storm that hit the most densely populated area of the country at the tail end of hurricane season followed by falling temperatures, snow, and enormous need throughout the region.

I want to begin by saying thank you to each and every one of you who donated money or raised your hand to join in serving those in need during the long weeks that followed landfall and to the thousands more who have served in our ongoing recovery efforts. So much great work was done by so many – the numbers are truly staggering.

  • More than 17 million meals and snacks were served
  • More than 7 million relief items were distributed
  • 74,000 over-night shelter stays were accommodated
  • More than 5,100 households have been provided over $32 million of move-in assistance
  • More than $91 million has been provided to dozens of nonprofits with specialized expertise and strong local ties

During the peak of the response and for weeks after Sandy’s landfall, we were providing 130,000 to 150,000 meals and snacks a day. Imagine handing a meal or snack to every person at a sold-out New York Giants or Jets game AND a sold-out Yankees game, every day, from Halloween until after Christmas. None of this would have been possible without the hearts of our volunteers and the generosity of our donors.

sandy-pie-chartMore than 17,000 of you put on a vest and put your lives on hold to serve others. Many of you stayed to serve past your 3 week commitment or returned to serve during the holidays. Your work has greatly benefited those affected by Sandy, not just in the initial response, but also through our recovery efforts, which continue to this day. Across New Jersey, New York and Connecticut the work goes on.  With our partners and the local regions we continue to serve those affected, through grant-funded home rebuilds, volunteer trainings and convening long-term recovery groups.  And our surveys show an overwhelming majority of those we served reported a positive experience with the Red Cross.

While we are proud of our response, we also know that we can always do better. “Good enough” is not the standard we seek to reach. We’re always striving to improve because we know the American public and the people we serve expect nothing less.

Throughout its 133-year history, the American Red Cross has continued to make changes and find new and more efficient ways to do things. In fact, this drive to learn and do better started with Clara Baron, the founder of the American Red Cross, who said, “I go for anything new that might improve the past.”

In that spirit, I want to close by sharing some of the improvements we’ve made based on what we learned from our work before, during and after Sandy.

Months before Sandy struck in October 2012, we began a process known as re-engineering. It began with a comprehensive and detailed examination of the way we approach disasters.

One of the main outcomes of that effort was a commitment to empower local Red Cross leaders on the ground, who know their communities best, to make more decisions locally. As a result of that commitment, we have moved nearly one-third of our disaster positions out of national headquarters and into the field, closer to the people we serve.

We are already seeing this new structure work. I’ve heard personally from those of you who served in Moore, Oklahoma after the tornadoes, Colorado after the floods, and Oso, Washington after the landslide.

If you look around at the major projects and work from the past year, you can see lessons from Sandy in many other places.

Preparedness: We saw during Sandy how critical preparedness is to response. Raising awareness of risks and preparedness actions at the community level can save lives in the first 48 to 72 hours after a storm.  Now we integrate preparedness into everything we do.

Response: The impact from Sandy was felt from Ohio and West Virginia to Vermont. This size of event allowed us to see where our systems could scale, as well as areas  where they couldn’t and we’ve made adjustments. Our new divisional structure and tools, such as our inventory management system, will allow us to streamline the movement of supplies and resources in a way we couldn’t before.

Recovery:  Perhaps the greatest lesson we learned was the value of having a standardized recovery program – one that is predictable and repeatable and that scales to meet the need.  You’ve probably seen the new Recovery Services program materials and resources; what’s currently available is just the start.

All this to say we’ve learned a great deal from Sandy and our many other operations over the past few years. We’re committed to taking the lessons we learn and applying them to the programs we create and the services we provide.

Last week, I was asked a very simple question by a reporter: “How would you characterize your response to Sandy?” My answer was equally simple – We couldn’t be prouder. We are proud of our efforts to help thousands of families move back into their homes. We are proud of the massive scale of feeding and distribution we provided. And, we are proud of the fact that we’ve spent or committed to spend 99 percent of the $311.5 million entrusted to us by our donors for our Sandy work.

Most importantly, we’re proud that when we put out the call for help, you answered, and it made a difference in the lives of others.

I am humbled to be a part of this amazing organization and to work each and every day alongside you to take care of those in need. We are committed to doing even better in the next disaster, and the one after that.

See more at: http://www.redcross.org/support/donating-fundraising/where-your-money-goes/sandy-response

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